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Careers In Television Careers-In-Television?

  • Subject: Performing Arts
  • |
  • Grade(s): 6-8
  • |
  • Duration: 3 class periods

Lesson Plan Sections

Student Objectives


  • Describe the different tasks that need to be completed to create a news program.
  • Focus on one of these tasks and collaborate with other students to develop a news program.
  • Present a news program that is shared with at least one other class in the school.

Materials


  • Discovering the Arts: Careers in Television video
  • Computer with Internet access
  • Newsprint and markers
  • Paper and pencils
  • Video equipment (optional)

Procedures


  1. Begin the lesson by asking students to write down any ideas they may have about how a news program is produced. What kinds of jobs are involved? How is a news program created? Give students a few minutes to write down their thoughts. Then have students put away their papers until later in the lesson.
  2. Tell students that they will create their own news program during the next two class periods. To give students some background on this topic, ask them to watch the segment entitled "Tonight at Six," part of the video,Discovering the Arts: Careers in Television .
  3. As a class, discuss the different groups of people who are involved in developing a news program. Write down students' ideas on a sheet of newsprint. Make sure that students include the following teams:
    • Producer and assistant producers. Producers decide on the topics that will appear in the news program.
    • Script writers and graphic designers. Writers develop the script that newscasters read. Graphic designers provide graphics that support the script.
    • Reporters. Reporters explore news stories in-depth and present reports during the news program.
    • Technical support. The camera crew, the sound team, and other technical staff help broadcast the news program.
  4. Divide students into three groups. Have one group take on the role of the producer and assistant producers; the second group, the role of the script writers and graphic designers; and the third group, the role of the reporters. Ask students to coordinate the different tasks of these groups to develop a coherent news program. (Note: If video equipment is available, create a fourth group, technical support, to set up and shoot the news program. Include this element if an adult is available to supervise the activity.)
  5. Give students time in class to develop the news program. They can focus on school news, world events, or a combination of the two. Circulate among the groups to make sure that the producers communicate with the reporters so that they know what stories to cover. Make sure that the script writers communicate with both groups so that they can develop appropriate copy. Emphasize to students the importance of collaboration in this endeavor. Remind students that stories can change at the last minute if a newsworthy event takes place.
  6. When students are ready, have them present their news program. If possible, invite another class to watch and critique the program. Have them consider the following questions:
    • Did students select appropriate topics?
    • Were the stories well written?
    • Was the program interesting and fast-paced? Did the reporters present the information in a compelling way?
    • How could the class improve the program?
  7. Conclude the lesson by asking students to revisit their initial ideas about producing a news program. What have they learned? Give students a few minutes to modify their ideas. Suggest that students use the experience of producing a news program as an opportunity to think about whether they would enjoy a career in television.

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Assessment


Use the following three-point rubric to evaluate students' work during this lesson.
  • 3 points:  Students showed a clear understanding of the different tasks that need to be completed to produce a news program; collaborated effectively with their classmates in developing the program; and actively participated in the final presentation of the news program.
  • 2 points:  Students showed some understanding of the different tasks that need to be completed to produce a news program; collaborated somewhat effectively with their classmates in developing the program; and participated in the final presentation of the news program.
  • 1 point:  Students showed little understanding of the different tasks that need to be completed to produce a news program; had difficulty collaborating with their classmates in developing the program; and participated minimally in the final presentation of the news program.

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Vocabulary


camera crew
Definition: The team that takes video footage of an event for a television broadcast
Context: The camera crew works behind the scenes to enhance the quality of the program.

graphic designer
Definition: A person who conveys information visually through the use of color, type, images, and animation
Context: Television stations employ graphic designers to create graphs, charts, and other kinds of visual displays.

reporter
Definition: A person who researches a topic, interviews key players, and presents his or her findings on a television news program
Context: During a crisis, such as a crime spree, reporters travel to the scene and keep the public informed about what is going on.

producer
Definition: A person who decides which stories to cover in a news program and coordinates the details of the program
Context: The producer may fill additional airtime with late-breaking stories.

script writer
Definition: A person who works with the producer and the reporters to develop a fluent narration that keeps the show moving
Context: Script writers use language carefully so that viewers can quickly grasp the most important issues of the day.

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Academic Standards


Consortium of National Arts Education Associations
The Consortium of National Arts Education Associations has developed national guidelines for what students should know and be able to do in the arts. To view the standards online, go toartsedge.kennedy-center.org/teach/standards.cfm.
This lesson plan addresses the following national standards:
  • Analyzing, critiquing, and constructing meanings from informal and formal theatre, film, television, and electronic media productions
  • Understanding context by analyzing the role of theatre, film, television, and electronic media in the past and the present
The National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS)
NCSS has developed national guidelines for teaching social studies. To become a member of NCSS, or to view the standards online, go tohttp://www.socialstudies.org/standards/strands/.
This lesson plan addresses the following thematic standards:
  • Culture
  • Individual Development and Identity

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