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Pendemonium: The Great China Chase: Adjectives Pendemonium-The-Great-China-Chase-Adjectives?

  • Subject: Grammar
  • |
  • Grade(s): K-5
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  • Duration: 1 class period

Lesson Plan Sections

Student Objectives


  • Identify adjectives, indefinite adjectives, and predicate adjectives.
  • Analyze how colors, numbers, and emotions serve as adjectives.
  • Explore the use of adjectives in writing stories.
  • Discover the power of adjectives and how they can make writing more interesting.
  • Work effectively in small groups.

Materials


  • The Great China Chase: Adjectives video
  • Paper and pencils
  • Blue, yellow, and green colored pencils or markers
  • Print resources about adjectives

Procedures


  1. After viewing the video, reinforce its concepts by readingHairy, Scary, Ordinary: What Is an Adjective? , by Brian P. Cleary, or a similar book with a lighthearted look at adjectives.
  2. Briefly review adjectives, indefinite adjectives, and predicate adjectives.
  3. Then ask a volunteer to begin a class-wide naming of adjectives. Have each student look around the room and name one adjective out loud. When the students run out of obvious adjectives, tell them to close their eyes and think of places they've been and people they've met. Also discuss how emotions, numbers, and colors can be used as adjectives. Provide several examples of each, such as happy, sad, angry.
  4. Write a sentence such as the following on the board.
    Sam was small and couldn't reach any of the tall, brown stuffed bears.
    Ask a volunteer to come up to the board and underline all the adjectives(small, any, tall, brown, stuffed) , circle the predicate adjectives(small) , and double underline the indefinite adjectives(any) .
  5. Divide the class into teams of three students each. Ask them to write a story with at least three paragraphs that includes at least 12 adjectives; of these, at least three must be indefinite adjectives and three must be predicate adjectives.
  6. Then have the groups read their stories to the class. After they have read it once, ask them to read it again. Instruct all students that, on the second read, whenever the reader mentions an adjective, indefinite adjective, or predicate adjective, he or she should saym "stop." Then the student should tell the class if the word is simply an adjective, an indefinite adjective, or a predicate adjective. Ask the rest of the class if they agree. When all concur, have the reader use colored markers or pencils to circle the words using the following guide:
    • adjectives circled in yellow
    • indefinite adjectives circled in blue
    • predicate adjectives circled in green
  7. After all groups have presented and color-coded their stories, ask the groups to rewrite their stories by deleting all the adjectives. Tell them to simply insert a blank line in place of the deleted adjective. Now have the groups exchange their stories and fill in the blanks, keeping in mind that they are still trying to tell a story: They shouldn't just fill in the adjectives with anything that comes to mind; they should give considerable thought to whether an adjective fits and helps the story.
  8. Then have volunteers from each group read the revised stories to the class.
  9. Following this, have a few volunteers read the original and the revised version of each story. Discuss the similarities and differences with the class. Be sure to point out how using adjectives makes stories much more interesting, clear, and understandable. Also emphasize how using different adjectives can drastically change a story.
  10. Post the students' work on a bulletin board so that all can enjoy the stories.

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Assessment


Use the following three-point rubric to evaluate students' work during this lesson.
  • 3 points:  Students consistently worked effectively in small groups, were consistently able to identify adjectives, indefinite adjectives, and predicate adjectives, were consistently able to create stories using adjectives (colors, numbers, and emotions), and always understood how adjectives were effective in improving their writing.
  • 2 points:  Students usually worked effectively in small groups, were usually able to identify adjectives, indefinite adjectives, and predicate adjectives, were usually able to create stories using adjectives (colors, numbers, and emotions), and usually understood how adjectives were effective in improving their writing.
  • 1 point:  Students rarely worked effectively in small groups, were rarely able to identify adjectives, indefinite adjectives, and predicate adjectives, were rarely able to create stories using adjectives (colors, numbers, and emotions), and rarely understood how adjectives were effective in improving their writing.

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Vocabulary


adjective
Definition: A word that modifies, or describes, a noun or pronoun
Context: Adjectives help readers picture what the writer wants to convey.

complicated
Definition: Something that contains many parts or ideas and may be difficult to use or understand
Context: The story was so complicated Josie had to read it three times to understand it.

indefinite adjective
Definition: A nonspecific word that modifies nouns and answers the question of how many or how much of something (all, many, any)
Context: This sentence uses two indefinite adjectives: Of the many books I've read, I enjoyed all of them.

modify
Definition: Describes a word or phrase
Context: Adjectives are words that modify nouns or pronouns.

predicate
Definition: Describes an adjective that follows verb rather than precede it
Context: In this sentence, "angry" is the predicate adjective: Sarah was upset that she was sick and couldn't attend the party.

translate
Definition: To express in a different language
Context: Renny will translate these words from English to Spanish.

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Print Resources


Cleary, Brian.Hairy, Scary, Ordinary: What Is an Adjective? Carolrhoda Books, 2001.
Many kinds of descriptive words are presented in upbeat, rhyming text

Dahl, Michael.If You Were an Adjective. Picture Window Books, 2006.

Heinrichs, Ann.Adjectives (Magic of Language) . Child's World, 2004.
Opens children to the wide world of adjectives

Trice, Linda.Kenya's Word. Charlesbridge Publishing, 2006.
While being introduced to Kenya's world, the reader learns about adjectives in an entertaining fashion.

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Academic Standards


Mid-continent Research for Education and Learning (McREL)
McREL''s Content Knowledge: A Compendium of Standards and Benchmarks for K-12 Education addresses 14 content areas. To view the standards and benchmarks, visithttp://www.mcrel.org/compendium/browse.asp.
This lesson plan addresses the following national standards:
  • Language Arts: Viewing - Uses viewing skills and strategies to understand and interpret visual media
  • Language Arts: Writing - Uses the general skills and strategies of the writing process; uses grammatical and mechanical conventions in written compositions
  • Language Arts: Reading - Uses the general skills and strategies of the reading process
  • Language Arts: Grammar and Usage - Uses adjectives in written compositions (e.g. indefinite, numerical, predicate adjective)
The National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE)
The National Council of Teachers of English and the International Reading Association have developed national standards to provide guidelines for teaching the English language arts. To view the standards online, go tohttp://www.ncte.org/standards.
  • Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.
  • Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g. spelling and punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and non-print texts.

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