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Reading StrategiesReading-Strategies

  • Subject: Reading
  • |
  • Grade(s): K-5
  • |
  • Duration: 1 class period

Lesson Plan Sections

Objectives


Students will
  • Learn that every story has a main idea and supporting details.
  • Find the main idea and several supporting details in a news story.

Materials


  • Reading Strategies video
  • Writing paper
  • Pencils and erasers
  • Scissors
  • Newspapers
  • Computer with Internet access (optional)

Procedures

  1. Introduce the topic of finding the main idea in a story by showing Reading Strategies. After watching, discuss what students learned about main ideas and supporting details. Ask them: What was the main idea of the pyramid segment? What are supporting details? How are they used in a story? Talk about books the students have read or movies they have seen in the classroom. What were the main ideas of these stories? What information did supporting details provide?
  2. Read a news story to the class. First, ask students to listen for the main idea and supporting details. Discuss the story with the students. What was the main idea? What were some supporting details?
  3. Divide students into small groups and give each one several newspapers. Tell students that they will choose at least four stories that everyone in the group will read. If newspapers are unavailable have students choose stories from the online news sources below or from your newspaper's Web site:
  4. Explain to students that they should identify the main idea and at least two supporting details in each of the stories. Have students number and cut out the stories, and give each group member a different story to read; tell students to write the number and the story headline on their writing paper. Explain that students should write the main idea and at least two supporting details directly under the number and headline. Once students finish with their own story, have them switch with a member of their group and repeat the process. They will to repeat the process until all members of the group have read all four stories.
  5. Hold a group discussion about the stories. Ask students to share some main ideas and supporting details. What kinds of information did they learn? If students identified different main ideas for the same story, have them explain their choice and ask the group to reread that particular story. Make sure all students have a firm understanding of a story's main idea.
  6. Ask volunteers to share some information their group learned from reading the news stories. Talk about the stories and the main ideas. For stories that may have been particularly difficult to read or understand, read them aloud have the class try to identify the main ideas.

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Evaluation


Use the following three-point rubric to evaluate students' work during this lesson.
  • Three points:  Students were highly engaged in class and group discussions; enthusiastically read all the news stories; had a good understanding of the main idea of each story and found at least two supporting details for each example; and demonstrated a solid understanding of the concept of main idea and supporting details.
  • Two points:  Students generally engaged in class and group discussions; read most of the news stories; had a general sense of the main idea of each story and found at least one supporting detail within each example; and demonstrated a basic understanding of the concept of main idea and supporting details.
  • One point:  Students participated minimally in class and group discussions; read two or fewer of the news stories; were unable to identify the main idea of each story and found one or fewer supporting details in each example; and did not demonstrate a basic understanding of the concept of main idea and supporting details.

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Vocabulary


details
Definition: Individual parts or information related to a whole
Context: Details are the pieces of information that tell you more about the main idea.

expression
Definition: The manner in which one conveys a feeling, thought or mood, especially in speaking, depicting or performing
Context: Listen to how a sentence sounds when it is read with feeling and expression.

information
Definition: Knowledge derived from study, experience or examination
Context: Many people read newspapers to get information daily.

read
Definition: To examine and grasp the meaning of written or printed characters, words or sentences
Context: You may read about familiar or completely new topics.

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Academic Standards


Mid-continent Research for Education and Learning (McREL)
McREL's Content Knowledge: A Compendium of Standards and Benchmarks for K-12 Education addresses 14 content areas. To view the standards and benchmarks, visithttp://www.mcrel.org/compendium/browse.asp
This lesson plan addresses the following national standards:

  • Language Arts-Reading: Uses the general skills and strategies of the writing process; Uses reading skills to understand and interpret a variety of informational texts; Uses reading skills and strategies to understand and interpret a variety of literary texts
  • Language Arts-Viewing: Uses viewing skills and strategies to understand and interpret visual media

The National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE)
The National Council of Teachers of English and the International Reading Association have developed national standards to provide guidelines for teaching the English language arts. To view the standards online, go tohttp://www.ncte.org/standards
This lesson plan addresses the following national standards:

  • Students use spoken, written and visual language to accomplish their own purposes
  • Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts
  • Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities

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