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Novo Nordisk and Discovery Education Launch “Super Health, Super You” National Community Health Challenge and Learning Curriculum

Charmion Kinder, Discovery Education
(240) 662-5203, Charmion_Kinder@discovery.com

Marisa Sharkey, Novo Nordisk Inc.
(609) 786-4784, mzsx@novonordisk.com

Silver Spring, Md. (August 31, 2017)Novo Nordisk, a global health care company and Discovery Education, the leading provider of digital content and professional development for K-12 classrooms, are challenging elementary school students to come up with new ways to help their neighbors make healthier lifestyle choices while leading more active lives. “Super Health, Super You,” a three-year educational program announced today, is designed to help elementary school teachers incorporate healthy lifestyle education into their curricula both inside and outside the classroom.

Through this program, the companies will engage and activate schools to think critically about health-related issues affecting their communities. “Super Health, Super You” offers numerous exercises and activities that present fundamental community health concepts and illustrate the importance of healthy lifestyle choices.

“We’ve been long committed to encouraging healthy lifestyles in the places where we live and work, and with Discovery Education we can help people understand the importance of overcoming barriers to healthy lifestyle choices,” says Diana Blankman, senior director, U.S. Corporate Giving & Social Impact at Novo Nordisk. “‘Super Health, Super You’ takes the lessons we’ve learned over the past few years supporting New Jersey neighborhoods, and takes them nationwide.”

As part of “Super Health, Super You,” Novo Nordisk and Discovery Education are launching the “Super Health, Super You” Community Health Challenge to showcase students’ efforts in improving healthy living and standards in their own communities. The program will award three $10,000 grants and will allow winning schools to implement their solutions in the following categories:

Community Health Challenge Prizes

  • Nutrition and Gardens Winner: One winning student group will be selected from entries addressing healthy eating and access to nutritious meals. The group will receive a $10,000 grant to implement their proposed community health solution.  
  • Physical Activity Winner: One winning student group will be selected from all entries addressing increased activity and physical fitness. The group will receive a $10,000 grant to promote their proposed community health solution.
  • Title 1 Winner: One winning student group will be selected from all Title 1 entrants to receive a $10,000 grant to promote their proposed community health solution. To be eligible, schools must be identified as Title 1 schools per the Elementary and Secondary Education Act by having high numbers or high percentages of children from low-income families.

Finalists will be selected by Discovery Education; Novo Nordisk will then select winners in each of the three categories. One winner will be named “Grand Prize Winner” and will receive an in-school assembly that includes a recognition ceremony. Submissions are accepted now through November 16, 2017 and winners will be announced in January 2018. More information on how to enter can be found here.

Serving as an online hub for the “Super Health, Super You” initiative, the “Super Health, Super You” website houses downloadable content about diabetes prevention, fitness, nutrition topics and latest news regarding the Community Challenge.

Online materials for educators and parents to access include:

  • Lesson Plans and Activities: Six lesson plans are available for upper elementary school students to highlight community health, including addressing external factors contributing to health, and the relationship between food choices and diabetes.
  • Digital Presentation: A student-facing presentation that walks students and teachers through planning and growing a garden. The presentation is available to classrooms.
  • Family Toolkit:  To extend the learnings beyond the classroom, a family toolkit comprised of two community-health based family activities – one family discussion prompt will be available later this year.

“Health and wellness are the cornerstones of students’ success. ‘Super Health, Super You’ and the Community Health Challenge are designed to help increase awareness and engagement about these important topics, and empower upper elementary schools students to start thinking critically about the future of community health,” says Lori McFarling, senior vice president at Discovery Education. “We’ve been equipping millions of educators with content and tools to complement their lessons plans, and are excited to tap into Novo Nordisk’s deep health care knowledge to help bring curriculum about health, exercise and nutrition to students.”

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About Discovery Education
Discovery Education is the global leader in standards-based digital content and professional development for K-12, transforming teaching and learning with award-winning digital textbooks, multimedia content that supports the implementation of Common Core, professional development, assessment tools, and the largest professional learning community of its kind. Serving 4.5 million educators and over 50 million students, Discovery Education’s services are in half of U.S. classrooms, 50 percent of all primary schools the UK, and more than 50 countries. Discovery Education partners with districts, states and like-minded organizations to captivate students, empower teachers, and transform classrooms with customized solutions that increase academic achievement. Discovery Education is powered by Discovery Communications (NASDAQ: DISCA, DISCB, DISCK), the number one nonfiction media company in the world. Explore the future of education at discoveryeducation.com.

About Novo Nordisk 
Novo Nordisk is a global health care company with more than 90 years of innovation and leadership in diabetes care. This heritage has given us experience and capabilities that also enable us to help people defeat other serious chronic conditions: hemophilia, growth disorders and obesity. With U.S. headquarters in Plainsboro, N.J., Novo Nordisk Inc. has nearly 5,000 employees in the United States. For more information, visit novonordisk.us or follow us on Twitter: @novonordiskus.

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Utah’s Wasatch County Schools Launches New Partnership with Discovery Education to Accelerate Digital Conversion Districtwide

Stephen Wakefield, Discovery Education
240-662-5563, stephen_Wakefield@discovery.com

– Award-Winning Digital Resources Combined with Professional Development to Strengthen District’s Five-Year 1:1 Teaching and Learning Strategy-

Silver Spring, Md. (August 29, 2017) – Utah’s Wasatch County School District (WCSD) today announced the launch of a new partnership with Discovery Education, the leading provider of digital content and professional development for K-12 classrooms.  Through this new collaboration, Discovery Education’s dynamic digital content and powerful professional development resources will accelerate WCSD’s districtwide five-year digital conversion.

WCSD is committed to ensuring all students learn at high academic levels and function effectively in society as productive, caring, and responsible citizens. To achieve this goal, WCSD is converting the district’s classrooms into dynamic digital learning environments through a five-year 1-to-1 initiative that is bringing Lenovo ThinkPads and interactive whiteboards into every classroom. To grow student engagement in teaching and learning and speed up this conversion, WCSD teachers will now be empowered to integrate Discovery Education’s award-winning content services and digital textbooks into classroom instruction.  In addition, Discovery Education will help WCSD’s educators evolve their teaching practice through sustained, job-embedded professional development that helps them become facilitators of student-centered learning experiences.

This new initiative was kicked-off during the district’s 4th Annual Wasatch Back Digital Learning Conference, which was held August 16-17. During this conference, which brought together educators from 10 neighboring districts to improve practice and drive digital conversions, district educators began to familiarize themselves with Discovery Education’s Streaming Plus service, which will be used by teachers and students districtwide in the coming year. 

Discovery Education Streaming Plus is a comprehensive digital service supplementing instruction across all K-12 curricular areas that help build students’ mastery in interpreting, understanding, and evaluating information across all subject areas. Students can access a variety of digital assets including images, primary source documents, podcasts, oral interviews, books on tape, articles, videos, and more, then are empowered to become content creators with a suite of content creation tools that help teachers and students safely and easily collaborate in real-time on virtual projects. Teacher resources include lesson plans, instructional strategies, and content collections organized around themes, as well as a collection of new STEM resources designed to fuel a cultural shift in teaching and learning.

Also during the Wasatch Back Digital Learning Conference, WCSD social studies teachers in grades 6 and 8 and 9 through 11 learned about the capabilities of the new Social Studies Techbook they will begin using this school year, and district educators teaching grades 3-12 explored how to use the  Science Techbook to ignite students’ interest in the natural world. 

Discovery Education’s Techbooks are breakthrough digital textbooks that are aligned to rigorous standards, support a comprehensive curriculum, and are updated regularly at no cost. The series encourages all learners through interactive features that change the reading level of text and enable text to be read aloud. The Techbook series saves teachers’ time with a comprehensive design that places model lessons, student activities and assessments at their fingertips. Techbooks are platform neutral and can be used in one-to-one or one-to-many configurations and in any instructional environment.

The Social Studies Techbook series uses an inquiry-based instructional approach that emphasizes informational text literacy, analytical writing, and problem-solving skills that students will apply in the classroom and beyond. Each subject area includes primary source documents and activities, digital investigations, multimedia reference library, interactive maps, and more. 

Utilizing an inquiry-based format built on the 5E model, Discovery Education’s Science Techbook helps teach students to read, write, and think like scientists through hands-on labs, digital explorations, an interactive glossary, and data analysis activities.  In addition, a host of new STEM/STEAM resources have recently been added to the Science Techbook that encourage students to connect math, technology, and engineering to their understanding of science concepts to produce creative solutions to real world problems.  

“Wasatch County School District is keenly focused on deepening our culture of excellence across the school system,” said Paul Sweat, WCSD’s Superintendent. “Our new partnership with Discovery Education will help us meet that goal and supports our efforts to accelerate and scale our districtwide digital conversion.”

Discovery Education will also conduct sustained professional development for educators across WCSD.  This immersive professional development, provided by Discovery Education’s expert faculty, will help district educators evolve their teaching practice to better meet the needs of today’s learners and effectively use their new digital resources in the classroom.  The Discovery Education Community will also support the WCSD’s educators’ efforts to transform students’ learning experiences with dynamic digital media. A global community of education professionals, the Discovery Education Community connects members across school systems and around the world through social media, virtual conferences, and in-person events, fostering valuable networking, idea sharing and inspiration.

“Discovery Education is pleased to add to the growing momentum of Wasatch County School District’s digital conversion,” said Jason Barnes, Discovery Education’s Education Partnerships Vice President. “We look forward to working with teachers and administrators across the school system to create dynamic digital classrooms that will engage students and grow academic achievement.”

For more information about Discovery Education’s digital content services, digital textbook series, and professional development resources, visit www.discoveryeducation.com, and stay connected with Discovery Education on social media through Facebook, follow us on Twitter at @DiscoveryEd, or find us on Instagram and Pinterest.

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About Discovery Education
Discovery Education is the global leader in standards-based digital content for K-12, transforming teaching and learning with award-winning digital textbooks, multimedia content, professional development, and the largest professional learning community of its kind. Serving 4.5 million educators and over 50 million students, Discovery Education’s services are in half of U.S. classrooms, 50 percent of all primary schools in the UK, and more than 50 countries. Discovery Education partners with districts, states, and like-minded organizations to captivate students, empower teachers, and transform classrooms with customized solutions that increase academic achievement. Discovery Education is powered by Discovery Communications (NASDAQ: DISCA, DISCB, DISCK), the number one nonfiction media company in the world. Explore the future of education at www.discoveryeducation.com.

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Discovery Education Chosen by California’s Oxnard Union High School District as Strategic Partner in Creating Digital Education Environments Districtwide

Stephen Wakefield, Discovery Education
240-662-5563, stephen_Wakefield@discovery.com

– Engaging Digital Content and Powerful Professional Development Initiative from Discovery Education to Empower Educators to Create Unique Digital Teaching and Learning Experiences for all Students-

Silver Spring, Md. (August 23, 2017) –  California’s Oxnard Union High School District (OUHSD) today announced it has chosen Discovery Education, the leading provider of digital content and professional development for K-12 classrooms, as its strategic partner in creating digital education environments districtwide.  Through this new collaboration, all OUHSD educators will soon begin integrating Discovery Education’s award-winning Streaming Plus service into instruction.  In addition, educators in six OUHSD schools will begin using Discovery Education’s digital  Math TechbookÔ and Science TechbookÔ as core instructional resources, while educators in three schools will begin using Discovery Education’s Social Studies TechbookÔ for teaching and learning. A robust, job-embedded professional development initiative will support teachers’ use of these dynamic new resources, helping educators across the school system transform their classroom practice to meet the ever-changing needs of today’s students.

OUHSD has a strong vision of high expectations and powerful futures for every student and is aligning their programs, curricula, instruction, services and supports to challenge each student to reach his or her own greatest potential.  OUHSD’s new partnership with Discovery Education is a critical component of the district’s ongoing effort to achieve this vision.  This new collaboration will increase academic rigor, improve student engagement, and create digital, student-centered education environments utilizing the highest quality digital content.

Discovery Education Streaming Plus is a comprehensive digital service supplementing instruction across all K-12 curricular areas that help build students’ mastery in interpreting, understanding, and evaluating information. Students can access a variety of digital assets including images, primary source documents, podcasts, oral interviews, books on tape, articles, videos, and more, then are empowered to become content creators with a suite of content creation tools that help teachers and students safely and easily collaborate in real-time on virtual projects. Teacher resources include lesson plans, instructional strategies, and content collections organized around themes, as well as a collection of new STEM resources designed to fuel a cultural shift in teaching and learning.

Discovery Education’s Techbooks are breakthrough digital textbooks that are aligned to rigorous standards, support a comprehensive curriculum, and are updated regularly at no cost. The series encourages all learners through interactive features that change the reading level of text and enable text to be read aloud. The Techbook series saves teachers’ time with a comprehensive design that places model lessons, student activities and assessments at their fingertips. Techbooks are platform neutral and can be used in one-to-one or one-to-many configurations and in any instructional environment.

Utilizing an inquiry-based format built on the 5E model, Discovery Education’s Science Techbook helps teach students to read, write, and think like scientists through hands-on labs, digital explorations, an interactive glossary, and data analysis activities. The Social Studies Techbook series uses an inquiry-based instructional approach that emphasizes informational text literacy, analytical writing, and problem-solving skills that students will apply in the classroom and beyond. Each subject area includes primary source documents and activities, digital investigations, multimedia reference library, interactive maps, and more.  Discovery Education’s Math Techbook is a digital textbook that connects students to math through real-world problems worth solving, combines conceptual understanding, procedural fluency, and application to help all students develop a long-lasting mastery of mathematics.

“At Oxnard Union High School District, we are committed to providing our educators the digital resources and professional development they need to deliver 21st-century educational opportunities that support the academic growth and success of every student,” said Dr. Penelope DeLeon, OUHSD Superintendent. “We are excited to partner with Discovery Education on this initiative, as they share our vision for modern education and are strongly committed to helping us achieve this goal.”

In addition to providing dynamic digital content to OUHSD educators and students, Discovery Education will also conduct sustained, job-embedded professional development for teachers districtwide.  This immersive professional development, provided by Discovery Education’s expert faculty, will help district educators evolve their teaching practice to better meet the needs of today’s learners and effectively use their new digital resources.  The Discovery Education Community will also support the OUHSD’s educators’ efforts to transform students’ learning experiences with dynamic digital media. A global community of education professionals, the Discovery Education Community connects members across school systems and around the world through social media, virtual conferences, and in-person events, fostering valuable networking, idea sharing and inspiration.

“We are deeply honored to work side by side with Oxnard Union High School District on this important effort,” said Andrew Bradigan, Education Partnerships Vice President for Discovery Education. “We look forward to supporting the district in their mission to transition towards a digital education environment that energizes every students’ classroom experience and expands educators’ skill sets.”

For more information about Discovery Education’s digital content services, digital textbook series, and professional development resources, visit www.discoveryeducation.com, and stay connected with Discovery Education on social media through Facebook, follow us on Twitter at @DiscoveryEd, or find us on Instagram and Pinterest.

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About Discovery Education
Discovery Education is the global leader in standards-based digital content for K-12, transforming teaching and learning with award-winning digital textbooks, multimedia content, professional development, and the largest professional learning community of its kind. Serving 4.5 million educators and over 50 million students, Discovery Education’s services are in half of U.S. classrooms, 50 percent of all primary schools in the UK, and more than 50 countries. Discovery Education partners with districts, states, and like-minded organizations to captivate students, empower teachers, and transform classrooms with customized solutions that increase academic achievement. Discovery Education is powered by Discovery Communications (NASDAQ: DISCA, DISCB, DISCK), the number one nonfiction media company in the world. Explore the future of education at www.discoveryeducation.com.

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Texas’ Spring Branch Independent School District Approves Strategic Partnership with Discovery Education Supporting New, Five-Year Strategic Teaching and Learning Plan

Stephen Wakefield, Discovery Education
240-662-5563, stephen_Wakefield@discovery.com

– Discovery Education’s Award-Winning Digital Content and Professional Development to Support District’s Efforts to Design Learning Environments and Experiences Meeting the Needs of All Students-

Silver Spring, Md. (August 9, 2017) – Texas’ Spring Branch Independent School District (SBISD) today announced it has approved a new strategic partnership with Discovery Education, the leading provider of digital content and professional development for K-12 classrooms. Through this new relationship. SBISD’s educators will be empowered with Discovery Education’s unique blend of digital content and professional development services to design learning environments and deliver learning experiences that value and build on the individual talents, needs, interests, and aspirations of all SBISD learners.

The launch of this new partnership directly supports Spring Branch T-2-4, which commits the district to the goal of doubling the number of students who complete a technical certificate or military training through a two or four-year degree. This ambitious goal will be reached through the school system’s strategic plan, The Learner’s Journey, which builds on some of SBISD’s strongest assets, such as the area’s supportive community and people, and is undergirded by the district’s core values of Every Child, Collective Greatness, Collaborative Spirit, Limitless Curiosity, and Moral Compass.

To support The Learner’s Journey and help reach Spring Branch T-2-4’s goal, SBISD’s K-12 educators will soon begin using Science TechbookÔ as a core instructional resource for science lessons.  Also, middle and high school teachers will receive access to Discovery Education’s Social Studies TechbookÔ and Math TechbookÔ, which will enable educators in those subjects to design and deliver dynamic digital learning experiences for all students. 

Discovery Education’s Techbooks are breakthrough digital textbooks that are aligned to rigorous standards, support a comprehensive curriculum, and are updated regularly at no cost. The series encourages all learners through interactive features that change the reading level of text and enable text to be read aloud. The Techbook series saves teachers’ time with a comprehensive design that places model lessons, student activities and assessments at their fingertips. Techbooks are platform neutral and can be used in one-to-one or one-to-many configurations and in any instructional environment.

Utilizing an inquiry-based format built on the 5E model, Discovery Education’s Science Techbook  helps teach students to read, write, and think like scientists through hands-on labs, digital explorations, an interactive glossary, and data analysis activities. The Social Studies Techbook series uses an inquiry-based instructional approach that emphasizes informational text literacy, analytical writing, and problem-solving skills that students will apply in the classroom and beyond. Each subject area includes primary source documents and activities, digital investigations, multimedia reference library, interactive maps, and more.  Discovery Education’s Math Techbook is a digital textbook that connects students to math through real-world problems worth solving, combines conceptual understanding, procedural fluency, and application to help all students develop a long-lasting mastery of mathematics.

In addition to offering dynamic digital content to SBISD educators, Discovery Education will also conduct sustained, job-embedded professional development for teachers districtwide.  This immersive professional development, provided by Discovery Education’s expert faculty, will help district educators evolve their teaching practice to better meet the needs of today’s learners and effectively use their new digital resources.

“At Spring Branch ISD, we hold non-negotiable the beliefs that each student should have an equal opportunity for success after high school and that all students can achieve more than they think possible,” said SBISD Superintendent Dr. Scott Muri. “Discovery Education shares these beliefs, and is dedicated to providing Spring Branch’s teachers the high-quality digital content and capacity-building professional development they need to turn these beliefs into reality for all students.”

The Discovery Education Community will support the SBISD’s educators’ efforts to transform students’ learning experiences with dynamic digital media. A global community of education professionals, the Discovery Education Community connects members across school systems and around the world through social media, virtual conferences, and in-person events, fostering valuable networking, idea sharing and inspiration.

“Discovery Education is proud to be a part of Spring Branch Independent School District’s effort to double the number of students who complete a technical certificate or military training through a two or four-year degree,” said Phillip Mikula, Educational Partnerships Director for Discovery Education. “We look forward to working with Dr. Muri and his tremendous team of teachers and administrators on our joint mission to create learning experiences that value and build on the individual talents, needs, interests, and aspirations of every child.”

For more information about Discovery Education’s digital content services, digital textbook series, and professional development resources, visit www.discoveryeducation.com, and stay connected with Discovery Education on social media through Facebook, follow us on Twitter at @DiscoveryEd, or find us on Instagram and Pinterest.

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About Discovery Education
Discovery Education is the global leader in standards-based digital content for K-12, transforming teaching and learning with award-winning digital textbooks, multimedia content, professional development, and the largest professional learning community of its kind. Serving 4.5 million educators and over 50 million students, Discovery Education’s services are in half of U.S. classrooms, 50 percent of all primary schools in the UK, and more than 50 countries. Discovery Education partners with districts, states, and like-minded organizations to captivate students, empower teachers, and transform classrooms with customized solutions that increase academic achievement. Discovery Education is powered by Discovery Communications (NASDAQ: DISCA, DISCB, DISCK), the number one nonfiction media company in the world. Explore the future of education at www.discoveryeducation.com.

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How St. Vrain Valley Schools Started a STEM Revolution

Eight years ago, St. Vrain Valley Schools in Colorado started a STEM revolution. Today, its students, with projects that stretch from building robots to helping save an endangered species of frog, are reaping the benefits. We are proud to showcase this district’s transformation with an in-depth report that covers each major milestone on a decade-long journey to empower students.

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Introduction

St. Vrain Valley Schools in Colorado is on a roll. In just under a decade, the district of 32,000 students has transformed itself through a variety of initiatives to provide students with a hands-on education that sets them up for success well beyond the halls of their schools.

During this time, the district launched an Innovation Center, where students use their STEM knowledge in real-world projects; it opened a P-TECH school that allows students to earn an associate’s degree and high school diploma in six years; it has pulled in more than $20 million in national and state grants for a variety of programs; and its list of public–private partnerships have expanded to encompass national companies such as Lockheed Martin, Apple, and IBM. If that’s not enough, the district, located about 35 miles north of Denver, has netted nearly 90 awards for its academic programs in the past five years, and it regularly hosts visitors from other school districts and corporations.

While outside recognition is great, St. Vrain has also garnered the approval of the 13 communities that comprise the district. Last year, voters overwhelmingly approved the district’s financial plan, agreeing to a $260 million bond that will allow the district to build four new schools while expanding the footprint of another 29 schools—no small feat for a school district in Colorado, where the purse strings are tightly controlled by the state. Parents effectively bought into the process of transforming the district to help raise their children to new heights.

All of these investments are coming online just in time, as the district is adding 800 new students each year, making it one of the fastest-growing school districts in the state.

The road to the district’s success began about a decade ago. Examining the steps district leaders took reveals how administrators made deep cuts in legacy resources to invest in new avenues, and launched new innovations, ensuring improvements were instituted district-wide instead of just school by school, while always continuing to push for improvements.

Superintendent Dr. Don Haddad with St. Vrain elementary students.

“Our systematic approach is very unique,” says Superintendent Dr. Don Haddad. “What we’ve done is establish a pre-K–12 system where every one of our schools is focused on the things that we know work.”

Haddad highlights the core components of St. Vrain—a district-wide 1:1 program, STEM studies that start at pre-K and run into higher education, curricula that push students to problem solve and employ critical thinking skills, a “design thinking” mindset from administrators, public–private partnerships, and effective professional learning that reinforces all these ideas.

“That’s what makes the system work. What you see as a result is systematic gain. It’s not limited to one school—it’s districtwide,” he adds.

When former Secretary of Education Arne Duncan visited the district’s Skyline High School in 2014, he agreed:

“This is a remarkable success story. This is how students should be learning around the country.”

Envisioning a Transformation

The district’s first move in reinventing itself was building a comprehensive plan to support a variety of programs related to 21st-century careers. The programs focused on STEM, medical and bio-sciences, international baccalaureate, aerospace, and energy, among others. The idea was to create schools of choice for students, allowing them to pursue pathways they were passionate about, which could lead to interests in college and eventually a career.

These initiatives, in concert with a plethora of programs such as music, art, and athletics, made for a strong, comprehensive direction for the district, said Haddad.

Officials created a STEM Academy at Skyline High School, one of its 10 high schools, using STEM to both engage learners and interest them in pursuing post-secondary education. The academy quickly outpaced those modest goals and set into motion a series of domino-like changes that have transformed the district into a national leader.

Eerie High School students work on assembling a drone in class.

The short timeline to prominence at St. Vrain began when the district reeled in a $3.6 million Investing in Innovation federal grant in 2010, just one year after Haddad was named superintendent. That grant helped establish the STEM center, but also led to a longer school day for at-risk students in four elementary schools and an intervention program designed to help middle school students in danger of failing math.

The improvements from those funds led to an even bigger prize when St. Vrain was one of 16 Race to the Top winners. The federal $16.6 million award allowed the district to expand its STEM studies to all the schools that feed Skyline High School and to pursue creating Pathways in Technology Early College High School (P-TECH) with IBM.

Starting in 2016, St. Vrain was one of the first districts to partner with IBM on P-TECH outside of the original Brooklyn school in New York. This program offers students a chance to earn a high school diploma and an associate’s degree in a six-year block. The college courses are free for students, and partner IBM offers graduates interviews for jobs that pay $50,000 a year.

This work culminated in St. Vrain being named one of the 100 Future Ready school districts in the country and Haddad being named superintendent of the year in 2013 by the National Association of School Superintendents.

All this positive momentum in St. Vrain came after the district’s darkest days in 2002. That’s when a perfect storm of accounting errors, lower-than-expected revenues, and higher-than-expected expenses resulted in the district facing a $13.8 million shortfall on what was then a budget of $130 million.

With the state’s help, the district began a wide-ranging plan that included a 15 percent cut of its non-salary budget, a 45 percent slash to administrative costs, and a rollback of promised teacher and district employee raises. Teachers were supportive of the effort in order to help the district through this difficult time. The state also loaned the district $28 million and agreed to buy and lease back to the district a building for $4.8 million.

Making the Community a Partner

By 2005, things were looking better. The district was still recovering from the financial crisis, but it had implemented sound financial processes and procedures. In addition, the district received an excellence in financial reporting award from the Government Finance Officers Association.

However, the district was in need of additional local funding through a process called a mill levy override, which could only come after approval from local voters. And though the district had made strides in securing state funding, it still needed to win over locals with its vision for St. Vrain’s future.

In 2004, the district had lost a mill levy override by just 159 votes. The next year’s effort was rejected by 54 percent of voters. So when another mill levy override was suggested in 2008, the school board knew that gaining the trust of the community would require the involvement of the community. The board would not attempt another mill levy override unless they had the support of the community.

The board told parents: “If this is important, then do something about it,” recalls Laura McDonald, the parent of two St. Vrain students.

McDonald and a small group of parents accepted the challenge from the school board and launched what eventually became Grassroots St. Vrain, the leading community arm of the 2008 campaign for a $16.5 million mill levy override, which would later pass with 57 percent of the vote.

McDonald admits the group’s leaders had a “tip of the iceberg” level of knowledge about school funding when they started. But the leadership was strong, and the school district did not want to lose the community momentum. In 2009, the school district partnered with community leaders to create Leadership St. Vrain with the goal of helping community members deepen their understanding of the business of education.

Students from Indian Peaks Elementary start STEM projects at an early age.

These community members agreed to meet for three hours each month for nine months to learn about the inner workings of the school district, including who the state-level decision makers were, down to what curricula were used in classrooms. Only one of these sessions was focused on school funding, but McDonald says a subgroup of the initial Leadership St. Vrain group decided to formalize Grassroots St. Vrain into a nonprofit organization focused on school funding issues.

Just as St. Vrain was coming out its financial difficulties, the state found itself in a deficit. In 2010, Colorado ultimately decided to reduce per-pupil spending back to 2006–07 levels, cutting about $14 million from St. Vrain. The district absorbed the cut by slashing budgets 25 percent, freezing textbook adoptions, and pushing the adult basic education program outside the district’s purview.

Thanks to its community challenge during the 2008 mill levy override, and the continued community education through Leadership St. Vrain, the district had established a new partner as it tried to stabilize its funding—Grassroots St. Vrain. This nonprofit group, created by parents, is committed to advocating for school district improvements by both explaining and supporting mill levy overrides that allow the district to add funding to what the state provides.

Grassroots has become a reliable resource of facts about various school funding topics, McDonald says, giving the group lasting power in the community. Grassroots has made videos to help explain the state funding formula, local initiatives, and yes, even where marijuana tax money goes in Colorado (mostly to cover an increase in state services, with some going to school districts).

The financial uncertainty over the years actually led the district to build a more stable system. In 2012, hard work by the district and Grassroots paid off again. St. Vrain passed a $14.8 million mill levy override that gave teachers raises, maintained class sizes, and helped fund preschool for low-income students. In 2016, voters in the district easily passed a $260 million bond issue, with 59 percent of voters approving.

As of the 2015-2016 school year, St. Vrain’s general fund per-pupil expenditures were $8,584. The district’s $252 million in general fund expenditures were funded almost equally from state and local sources. Those two groups account for the majority of the district’s general fund revenues, with federal grants accounting for just one percent.

Still, McDonald says, “Relying on local mill levy overrides is not a good solution.” While St. Vrain is fortunate to have passed its last two overrides and bond issues, this isn’t possible for many other districts, because they may not have the needed political support or property tax value, she adds. That’s a big reason Grassroots St. Vrain focuses much of its work on looking at state-level solutions.

“The fact that we stabilized our funding helped us move forward with the transition,” says Greg Fieth, the district’s chief financial officer.

“We always have funding challenges, so that’s why it’s important to engage the community so that you not only limit the problem, but step over them,” says Haddad.

Targeting ‘Total Equity’

In 2009 Haddad was promoted to superintendent, and he and his team quickly realized that they were leading “a district of schools versus a school district.” Within a district that covers 411 square miles, there was a lot of inequity between the 55 schools, he remembers.

“You could go to any of our schools and you would find huge variances in programming, wide swings in technology, and disparities in the quality of the facilities,” he said.

Remedying that imbalance became a top priority for his administration. Plans were already under way to use the funds from a $189 million bond to renovate and make over the district. The superintendent insisted on achieving “total equity” in schools across the district.

The district went a step further under the leadership of Tori Teague, the assistant superintendent of curriculum and instruction. Teague led an effort to reorganize curricula, eliminating the typical gaps between elementary, middle, and high school. Once this was completed, the district was ready to tackle the needed infrastructure improvements that could pave the way for the later digital transformation.

Joe McBreen became the district’s chief technology officer the same year Haddad became superintendent. He recalls that even during the district’s lean years, it invested in fiber optic networks because officials knew technology would be important to the future of the district.

But in St. Vrain, “it’s not as simple as putting in a fiber line and having it hit every school,” says Fieth. Comprising 13 communities and 411 square miles of territory means it’s necessary to work with each of the municipalities to ensure every building has access to a fiber-optic network and wireless network capability in each classroom.

Students at Falcon Tech work with industry mentors.

Going 1:1 With Technology

With finances stabilized and an infrastructure in place, the district was ready to make changes that would intensify the impact on students in its classrooms. Over four years, the district provided all students in middle school and high school with iPad minis. Elementary classrooms received five to seven tablets each.

“When it came time to look at the technology piece, it was easy to decide this was the next layer of that, and we implemented it across the board. We looked at digital curriculum because that is an easy way to implement the technology.  We really see these devices as extensions of collaboration,” said Teague.

Right from the beginning, the district made sure professional learning was a key part of any technology upgrades. “Even in the leanest budget years, we made it a priority that 20 percent of any tech investment would go toward professional development,” says Fieth.

“We were intentionally aware of avoiding the ‘bright shiny object’ syndrome,” says McBreen. “Teachers can become enthralled by the latest, greatest technology, but it’s about purpose.”

Adam Wellington, an eighth-grade social studies teacher at Coal Ridge Middle School, details how the support helped teachers during those early days of integrating technology en masse. Getting the iPads three to four months before students afforded staff extra time to work with instructional tech coordinators, helping them pivot from delivering information to guiding students to finding information themselves.

Wellington’s school also holds “tech slams,” where teachers take a minute or two to share a new tool they are using in the classroom.

“It’s a very open environment, and it’s helped our staff see the benefits of what technology can do,” he adds.

Fifth-grade students program Dash and Dot robots at Longmont Estates Elementary School.

Presenting the material in a new way can boost student understanding, too. Wellington says the district’s move to use Discovery Education’s Techbook “has really changed how our students can understand our curriculum.”

As soon as the district got teachers familiar with tablets, they quickly realized that parents needed a crash course, too. “We found that parents didn’t know exactly how to get students to turn off the devices and disengage,” said Teague.

Eventually St. Vrain started a Camp iPad for parents, where students would show what they were doing with the devices. A tech newsletter was also distributed, and the district hosted technology nights at schools to orient parents to the new devices.

“I think that first year we had a lot of questions continually come up. [Now] it’s almost gotten down to zero,” Teague says.

“I think it’s critical that you’re very proactive with parents in any technology implementation. If a school district doesn’t do that, it will fail.”

Investing that time with parents made a huge difference for St. Vrain, garnering goodwill that spread beyond the scope of technology instruction, says Teague.

“What’s really cool about it is that it creates equity across the system,” she said. “For some families, they have not had any technology at home, and now all their kids have iPads. Kids can share it with parents, and families cherish it.”

Learning in the Great Outdoors

While expanding their learning horizons through a district-wide 1:1 transition, students at St. Vrain schools have also been engaged in ambitious activities outside the classroom. Through a series of community outreach efforts, St. Vrain’s high school students are working with scientists, park rangers, city officials — even shark researchers. They’re receiving a science education with a career context and learning how science can be applied in real life, filling them with newfound focus and experiences they can apply back to their classroom studies.

Read our previous feature article for more about St. Vrain’s environmental literacy programs.

Michael O’Toole, the K–12 science coordinator at St. Vrain Valley schools, has a vision for how STEM studies like these can be applied across all subjects to build a stronger foundation for future learners.

“We’re fortunate to have a 1:1 environment, in which our secondary students each have an iPad, but we are still committed to a hands-on science experience,” said O’Toole.

O’Toole has taken his environmental learning to vistas like Tanzania and Mount Kilimanjaro, sharing excursions with other learners online. On one particular trip in 2015, students from Nigeria, Oman, South Africa, Tanzania, and the United States explored the unique biomes and the summit of Kilimanjaro. As students planted their feet atop the 19,341-foot summit, other students from all over the world watched online, expanding the scope of environmental learning.

“In science, we have an opportunity to become citizen scientists, where students not only learn but help contribute to something bigger than themselves,” he said.

“All of this contributes to the overall knowledge of our community and planet as well as giving students real-world experiences.”

St. Vrain’s educators are finding new ways to use Discovery Education Science Techbook as a platform to enhance the hands-on experience of students, he said.

“We are always looking for ways to incorporate 21st-century skills such as creativity, critical thinking, and collaboration. This mindset allows our teachers to push past previous limits of traditional educational practices, unleashing the learning and contribution potential of our future scientists,” said O’Toole.

Securing National Grants

A key piece of St. Vrain’s transformation clicked into place as the district started to gain national recognition, and funding, to help propel its improvements. The first instance of national acclaim occurred in 2010 when the district earned an Investing in Innovation grant from the U.S. Department of Education. These coveted awards, known as i3 grants, were created in response to the recession of 2009 in an effort to help supplement school spending and to fund experiments that aimed to improve the achievements of disadvantaged students.

In the first year, awards were open to individual districts instead of states. St. Vrain’s application was one of 1,700 to vie for a portion of the $650 million fund. More than 300 judges pored over the applications, rating them on a 105-point scale. St. Vrain got the top score of all the applicants, garnering a $3.6 million grant over five years.

One little-known part of the i3 grants was that grantees needed to match at least 20 percent of the award with funds from the private sector. For St. Vrain, that meant getting $721,000. Ridgeview Communications, a telecommunications company, agreed to provide $734,000 of in-kind donations over five years. This included internet access, consultation with district officials, and technical support. IBM also stepped up, contributing $215,000 worth of software to the seven schools named in the grant. IBM went a step further, donating software to 14 other St. Vrain schools, although that total of $436,000 couldn’t be counted to match the i3 grant.

After launching the STEM Academy within Skyline High School, which focused specifically on engineering and computer science, Haddad recalls that their district was becoming more visible.

“People were paying attention to what we were doing, and different companies were wanting to provide support,” Haddad says.

Teaming up with the University of Colorado Boulder’s School of Engineering to create the academy, St. Vrain administrators started by identifying the skills needed to be successful in college.

Patty Quinones, who was then the school’s principal and is now the district’s assistant superintendent of innovation, worked backward to translate the end goals into curricula that met the state’s academic standards. Program graduates with good grades were guaranteed entry to CU’s College of Applied Sciences.

About 240 students have graduated from the STEM Academy in its eight years, and nearly 40 percent of them have gone on to STEM-related postsecondary programs. The graduation rate for the academy has jumped four percentage points, to 81 percent.

As impressive as St. Vrain’s i3 win was, it was only a warm-up for what was to come. While 49 organizations and districts won i3 grants, St. Vrain was about to join even more exclusive company two years later. With an application based on the same STEM program that netted the i3 award, St. Vrain won a Race to the Top (RTTT) grant in 2012, grabbing $16.6 million. This time the district was one of 16 winners out of more than 350 applications.

The RTTT grant focused on programs related to technology, professional development, extending the school year, and Skyline High School’s STEM program. It also helped bring that program to the high school’s seven feeder schools, which served many of the district’s minority students and English-language learners.

As good as this progress was, district leadership recognized that something was missing. The district put together a robust STEM curriculum, which included project-based learning and working with engineering students and faculty from the University of Colorado’s Boulder campus.

Launching the Innovation Center

The goal for the district’s newly created Innovation Center was simple but challenging. The district wanted students to use the center to stretch themselves by mixing their creativity with top-notch tools to work for clients outside the school district.

St. Vrain’s Innovation Center began three years ago. The 6,000-square-foot center is located at the district’s career development center. It’s stocked with a bevy of tools students can use for their various projects, including a technology lab, an electronics lab, and fabrication and wood tools. The center also includes high-end industry equipment, such as a laser cutter, five 3D printers, and a scanner. Perhaps the most eye-popping tools in the center are the Nao programmable humanoid robots. These 23-inch-high robots have been used everywhere, from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute to the French Institute of Health and Medical Research, where they were used to train International Space Station crews and assist elderly patients.

Not only do students take high-end courses and gain industry certifications through their work at the center, those working on projects for clients earn $10 an hour.

“It expands their opportunities and skill sets,” Quinones adds.

For example, the center is the only school of its kind in the country where students can earn Apple certification for technicians. Successful students can walk out of high school and earn $45,000 working for Apple or third-party companies, but St. Vrain encourages the students to attend college and work at fixing Apple products while there. In this way, students also leave college with a solid work history.

Students at the Innovation Center in St. Vrain Valley Schools interact with virtual reality headsets.

This year, 24 students gained the certification, and the group worked not only for the district but also for the city of Longmont. Students help the district roll out technology, and they conducted workshops to train Longmont firefighters and policemen how to use new iPhones.

Perhaps the best manifestation of the type of work that students complete at the center is the project that has students working to save an endangered frog in Bolivia and Peru. The students built an underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV) that they named Thelma. This device can go twice as deep as a scuba diver, and it is equipped with sensors that can record the water’s properties.

“Our students not only built the underwater ROV, but they also communicate with the marine biologists [using the device]. Because some students are bilingual, they communicate with the scientists directly,” Quinones says.

While district staff oversee student work and keep projects on track, the more important oversight comes from outside experts. The project lead initiates the logistics and sets timelines, and students fill out time cards. Because they get paid, all students are run through the district’s human resources department.

Students have built robots, done computer programming, designed apps and websites, and even served as beta testers for companies.

As good as the center’s results have been in the first three years, the district is excited about the future. Thanks to $20 million from the $260 million bond initiative that passed last year, the center will be getting its own stand-alone building for the 2016-2017 school year. The 50,000-square-foot center will be able to serve all of St. Vrain’s schools.

In addition to the high-tech tools the district already deploys, the center will have four new components. An entrepreneurial zone will allow students to hone small-business skills, while a “pitch room” aims to replicate the SXSW Accelerator product demonstration spaces, and a biomedical engineering lab will allow students to work with various higher education partners. In the center’s new aeronautics division, students will be able to create ROV projects, conduct flight testing, and build drones.

“Our team visited Stanford Design School, and many of the things that we saw served to inform us as we built this program,” said Haddad.

“I feel like St. Vrain and the Innovation Center have definitely changed students’ pathways for higher-paying jobs and better opportunities to look at their choices of careers,” Quinones says.

“We’ve made huge differences for students who didn’t see themselves going to college or becoming engineers, mathematicians, or scientists.”

Fostering Public-Private Partnerships

The crown jewel for St. Vrain is the creation of over 60 partnerships with large companies such as IBM, Apple, and Toyota.

Other prominent partners include:

  • OtterBox, which makes durable cases for mobile phones
  • Aldebaran Robotics, which makes the humanoid Nao robot
  • Esri, a GIS mapping software company
  • Sphero, a Boulder-based company that makes app-connected toys
  • SparkFun Electronics, a Colorado-based maker of microcontroller development boards
  • Red Idea Partners, a consulting and venture capital company in the food, technology, and consumer markets

The evolution of St. Vrain’s partnership with IBM helps illuminate how the best collaborations not only serve the company and the district, but also can deepen over time. IBM is a neighbor of St. Vrain, with a massive facility in nearby Boulder. IBM created its 500-acre Boulder facility in 1965; it includes 2.5 million square feet of space and 26 buildings.

The district expanded its partnership with IBM in 2009 when the company recognized the excellence and potential at St. Vrain.  IBM agreed to in-kind donations to the district for the i3 grant in 2010. When St. Vrain went after its Race to the Top (RTTT) grant in 2012, IBM upped its involvement with the district. District officials asked the company how they could help interest their youngest learners—kindergarten to second grade—with STEM and science programs.

P-Tech students meet with industry mentors from IBM.

“We looked at each other and thought ‘Whoa,’” says Ray Johnson, IBM’s corporate citizenship and corporate affairs manager. “It was a great idea.”

IBM and St. Vrain agreed to create a two-week Innovation Academy for a Smarter Planet. The program, run with the University of Colorado, targets elementary school students and runs during the summer months. One project, designed by fourth graders, is a “nonbullying social media app” that can tag objectionable language.

The program marks its seventh year in 2017. This year 240 students attended what one teacher calls “engineering summer camp.” Students spend one week at an IBM training center and the second week refining their prototypes at St. Vrain’s Innovation Center. From this work, district officials, with help from three IBM representatives, have now created a STEM preschool.

“I always say we don’t give kids, especially young kids, enough credit for what their minds are capable of absorbing at such a young age,” Johnson says. “They are like sponges. At the end of two weeks, second-graders are using terms like prototype.”

Talking about the deep partnership between the district and the company, Johnson says St. Vrain has been an aggressively innovative district.

“That made it easy for us to see what they wanted to accomplish and let them know what we wanted to be part of,” said Johnson, adding that like most companies, IBM is happy to offer intellectual expertise more than just a check, because that is where true value lies.

IBM’s involvement with St. Vrain went up another notch when the two, along with Front Range Community College, opened the first of three P-TECH 9-14 schools in Colorado last year. That school, Falcon Tech, has a six-year program that allows students to earn both a high school diploma and an associate’s degree in four to six years, at no charge to the student. The school features integrated high school and college coursework, along with rich workplace experiences, including mentoring, site visits, paid internships, and “first-in-line” job interview opportunities from IBM.

“It’s a real boost for the economy, because you’re creating a talent pipeline for a number of industries, and it’s a boost for the school districts. Graduation rates go up, and kids get the attention and support to earn a college degree and be ready with the skills required for 21st-Century careers,” Johnson said.

Student Achievements

So with all this progress, how are St. Vrain’s students doing? By a variety of measures, the needle is pointing up. In 2017, students achieved the highest average ACT scores in the district’s history, and they took 3,500 AP tests, an increase of 1,000 tests just from last year. The district’s graduation rate jumped 3 percentage points in the last year alone.

The district’s English language learners and special education students do still face a significant achievement gap. Given that ELL students are 15 percent of St. Vrain’s student population and special education students 10 percent, this is a significant number of students. In the district’s accreditation rating, the district met the performance indicators in both academic achievement and academic growth at its elementary and middle schools. In its high schools, the district’s results are labeled “approaching” in achievement and growth.

Haddad prefers to look beyond just state test scores to get a full picture of the district’s health and its trajectory. The news there is also good.

“Discipline rates have plummeted and enrollment, a true test of what you’re offering, is skyrocketing. Kids are coming to St. Vrain in droves,” he says.

The district leader goes outside the numbers to highlight the top reason for the district’s growth.

“Our district’s overall success is a result of all stakeholders, including the students, the teachers, the classified staff, the parents, the business community, and the elected officials, coming together to make a strong statement that educating our children is our top priority. And we in the St. Vrain Valley Schools could not be more grateful to the community for their support.

“That’s at the heart of why we’re so successful,” said Haddad.

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Discovery Education Offers No-Cost Resources, Special Content Collection, and More to Engage Students in 2017’s Great American Eclipse

Stephen Wakefield, Discovery Education
240-662-5563, stephen_Wakefield@discovery.com

New Resources Empower Teachers to Bring this Unique Phenomena to Life for Students Nationwide-

Silver Spring, Md. (Aug. 1, 2017) – Discovery Education, the leading provider of digital content and professional development for K-12 classrooms, is providing teachers and students nationwide a host of engaging digital resources to help them experience the Great American Eclipse on August 21, 2017, and integrate this unique learning opportunity into classroom instruction.

Among the Discovery Education resources available to help educators ignite the inquiry process and students’ natural sense of curiosity about the eclipse are a number of no-cost classroom digital resources.  Collected and reviewed by Discovery Education’s expert curriculum team, these resources include pictures and video explaining what actually occurs during an eclipse, information about the eclipse to help educators build-out classroom lessons around this phenomena, as well as a map detailing the 2017 Great American Eclipse’s march across North America.  These resources can be found at www.discoveryeducation.com/GreatAmericanEclipse.

Discovery Education has also placed additional digital resources within a special Great American Eclipse Content Collection. Accessible through both Discovery Education Streaming Plus and Discovery Education Science Techbook™, this special collection offers an even wider range of resources to support K-12 educators as they maximize the unique occasion of 2017’s coast to coast solar eclipse.

Also, between 10am PT/1pm ET – 12pm PT/ 3pm ET on August 21st, Discovery Education will host a live Twitter chat with internationally recognized astronomer and Director of Lowell Observatory Dr. Jeffrey Hall. During this online Q & A, Dr. Hall will answer questions from students around the country about the Great American Eclipse and discuss the science behind different types of eclipses.  In addition, courtesy of the Science Channel, Discovery Education’s  Great American Eclipse homepage will stream a portion of the eclipse live from Madras, Oregon.  Finally, throughout the day, Discovery Education’s FacebookTwitter, and Instagram accounts will provide educators and students updates on the progress of the eclipse, as well as a forum in which they can share their experiences and observations about this event using both #CelebrateWithDE and #GreatAmericanEclipse.

“An event the size and scope of the Great American Eclipse is a great ‘teachable moment’ that can be used to engage students in a variety of topics,” said Peter Panico, a 5th Grade Teacher at the Rama Road Elementary School in North Carolina’s Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools.  “I am looking forward to using the many Great American Eclipse resources Discovery Education is making available to jump-start my students’ thinking about this natural wonder.”

Discovery Education Streaming Plus is a comprehensive digital service supporting instruction across all K-12 curricular areas. The high-quality digital resources included in Discovery Education Streaming Plus help build students’ mastery in interpreting, evaluating, and citing accurate information. Students can access images, primary source documents, podcasts, oral interviews, books on tape, articles, and videos, and more, and are empowered to become content creators with a suite of content creation tools that help teachers and students safely and easily collaborate in real-time on virtual projects. Teacher resources include lesson plans, instructional strategies, and content collections organized around themes, as well as a collection of new STEM resources designed to fuel a cultural shift in teaching and learning.

Discovery Education’s Techbooks are breakthrough digital textbooks that are aligned to rigorous standards, support a comprehensive curriculum, and are updated regularly at no cost. The series encourages all learners through interactive features that change the reading level of text and enable text to be read aloud. The Techbook series saves teachers’ time with a comprehensive design that places model lessons, student activities and assessments at their fingertips. Techbooks are platform neutral and can be used in one-to-one or one-to-many configurations and in any instructional environment.

Utilizing an inquiry-based format built on the 5E model, Discovery Education’s Science Techbook, through hands-on labs, digital explorations, an interactive glossary, and data analysis activities, helps teach students to read, write, and think like scientists.  In addition, the Science Techbook also features a variety of STEM resources that help educators create engaging STEM learning experiences in their classrooms.

“While an event such as the Great American Eclipse comes but once a generation, it has the potential to be a learning experience for students that can last a lifetime,” said Marty Creel, Discovery Education’s Chief Academic Officer and Vice President of Digital Instruction. “Discovery Education is pleased to provide these engaging resources to teachers and students nationwide.  Our hope is that these materials will help inspire an interest in the scientific world among all who witness the Great American Eclipse.” 

For more information about Discovery Education Streaming Plus or the Discovery Education’s Techbooks, visit, www.discoveryeducation.com, and stay connected with Discovery Education on social media through Facebook, follow us on Twitter at @DiscoveryEd, or find us on Instagram and Pinterest.

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About Discovery EducationDiscovery Education is the global leader in standards-based digital content for K-12, transforming teaching and learning with award-winning digital textbooks, multimedia content, professional development, and the largest professional learning community of its kind. Serving 4.5 million educators and over 50 million students, Discovery Education’s services are in half of U.S. classrooms, 50 percent of all primary schools in the UK, and more than 50 countries. Discovery Education partners with districts, states, and like-minded organizations to captivate students, empower teachers, and transform classrooms with customized solutions that increase academic achievement. Discovery Education is powered by Discovery Communications (NASDAQ: DISCA, DISCB, DISCK), the number one nonfiction media company in the world. Explore the future of education at www.discoveryeducation.com.

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